Into the Amazon

Kirsten Silvius’s, research (with our lab) highlighted on Virginia Tech University’s home page ((http://www.vt.edu/) with photos by Jose Fragoso. The article describes how economists, fisheries biologists and wildlife managers are working together to set resource use policies in the Amazon. Story: “Virginia Tech Scientists work to Save the Amazon Rainforest and its Biodiversity” (http://www.vt.edu/spotlight/achievement/2015-08-17-amazon/cnre.html)

Kirsten Silvius & L. Flamarion de Oliviera

Kirsten Silvius’s, research (with our lab) highlighted on Virginia Tech University’s home page ((http://www.vt.edu/) with photos by Jose Fragoso. The article describes how economists, fisheries biologists and wildlife managers are working together to set resource use policies in the Amazon.

Full Story:

“Virginia Tech Scientists work to Save the Amazon Rainforest and its Biodiversity”

(http://www.vt.edu/spotlight/achievement/2015-08-17-amazon/cnre.html)

Jose Fragoso on National Public Radio

Jose Fragoso was interviewed by National Public Radio (NPR-USA) in Hawaii concerning The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation’s call for the US government to continue funding Kahoolawe, Hawaii’s biocultural restoration. The island was used by the US military for over 50 years for training exercises and as a bombing range.  The island is very important to Native Hawaiians.  You can hear the interview here: http://hpr2.org/post/conversation-thursday-july-16th-2015#stream/0

Scientists call on government to fund Kahoolawe, Hawaii restoration

The Maui News, Big Island Chronicle San Francisco SFGATE and Star Advertiser newspapers all carried stories citing The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation’s (ATBC) call for the US government to fund the biocultural restoration of Hawaii’s Kahoolawe Island.  In the articles ATBC’s representative Jose Fragoso calls for the US government to complete their agreement for cleaning up the island.  It was used for over 50 years for military exercises and as a bombing range.  You can view the articles here:
The Maui News:
Scientists call on government to fund Kahoolawe restoration
http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/600078/Scientists-call-on-government-to-fund-Kahoolawe-restoration.html

Big Island Chronicle:
Biologists to US: Keep your Word on Kho’olawe
http://www.bigislandchronicle.com/tag/association-of-tropical-biology-and-conservation/

The Star Advertiser:
Juy 17, 2015
http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20150717_Scientists_call_for_government_to_fund_K        ahoolawe_restoration.html?id=316136061
SFGATE (San Francisco):
Scientists call for government to fund Kahoolawe restoration
http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Scientists-call-for-government-to-fund-Kahoolawe-6391074.php

We have a new publication out in print

This publication looks at how different Christian religions influence indigenous people’s belief systems concerning hunting and meat taboos in the Amazon

Luzar J.B, Silvius K.M. and Fragoso JMV. 2012. Church Affiliation and Meat Taboos in Indigenous Communities of Guyanese Amazonia. Human Ecology 40:833-845.

 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10745-012-9521-4

Abstract

Using data from a three-year study of socioeconomic factors influencing hunting in 23 indigenous communities, we assess the influence of indigenous and Christian beliefs and practices on dietary taboos among Makushi and Wapishana peoples in the Guyanese Amazon. We found that members of Evangelical and established (Anglican and Catholic) churches do not differ significantly in terms of their adherence to dietary restrictions and members of Sabbatarian churches show a stronger tendency to adhere to dietary taboos than Evangelicals or members of established churches. Counter to expectations, we found no significant difference in avoidance of meat between households belonging to established and Evangelical churches. Furthermore, members of all church groups deviated in terms of dietary restrictions from indigenous norms as exemplified in dietary advice given by shamans. We conclude that, despite doctrinal opposition to shamanistic practices associated with indigenous taboos, there is continuity in terms of dietary practice among Makushi and Wapishana households that have converted to Evangelical and, to some degree, Sabbatarian forms of Christianity.

Dr. José Fragoso presents a plenary lecture at the “X Congreso Internacional de Manejo de Fauna Silvestre en la Amazonía y América Latina”

José Fragoso will be presenting a plenary lecture at the “X Congreso Internacional de Manejo de Fauna Silvestre en la Amazonía y América Latina” in Salta, Argentina on May 17, 2012.  The title of the talk is “Interacciones complejas entre biodiversidad y las tradiciones culturales de los pueblos indígenas amazónicos”.

Taal Levi, Kirsten Silvius, L. Flamarion de Oliveira and José Fragoso submit paper to Biotropica

Taal Levi, Kirsten Silvius, L. Flamarion de Oliveira and José Fragoso submitted a manuscript entitled “Competition and facilitation in the formation of interspecific primate groups” on April 3, 2012 to the journal “Biotropica”.

Dr. José Fragoso presents lecture at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

José M.V. Fragoso presented a lecture entitled “Interações Complexas entre a Biodiversidade e Culturas Indígenas” at the “Centro de Estudos Ameríndio” of the Univesidade do Sao Paulo (USP) on March 19, 2012. A video of the lecture (in Portuguese) can be seen at http://cesta.vitis.uspnet.usp.br/