Monthly Archives: September 2015

Gathering Data on Plants and Animals in the Amazon Basin

Caiman 4 092

Spectacled Caiman (photo by Jose Fragoso)

Stanford University produced a short documentary of our monitoring of plants and animals of the Amazon. Watch amazing scenes of caimans, capybaras, tapirs, giant anteaters, giant otters, macaws and other unusual creatures filmed during our field studies. The interview focuses on the successful monitoring of these animals by indigenous people. The take home message is that indigenous people use wildlife in a sustainable fashion.

Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upmzEzuF_ls


Sustainability of indigenous culture, land and resources in the Amazon

Fragoso Flyer 3-2-2015Jose Fragoso gives lecture at Stanford’s Native American Cultural Center on indigenous spirituality and the sustainability of culture and the environment. http://events-prod.stanford.edu/events/499/49961/


Monitoring in Support of Local, National and International Environmental Priorities

Bina Hill students addressing commuity problems with our project at Bina Hill 2 workshop

Community discussion of potential problems of environmental monitoring by villagers (photo Jose Fragoso)

Jose Fragoso lectures at Stanford’s Center for Latin American Studies (link: http://events.stanford.edu/events/482/48261/) on what leads to success and failure in environmental and social monitoring by local people.

You can view a video recording of the lecture here: https://vimeo.com/117443887

The lecture is highly recommended for academics, researchers, professionals and students interested in the success and failure of participatory and citizen science monitoring approaches


“A fine line: new computer program predicts when human impact becomes too much”

Village by an Amazonian river (photo by Jose Fragoso)

We have completed a major work describing the sustainability of hunting, farming (land use) and local livelihoods in the tropics. We devised an agent based computer simulation model and explored the relationships between the above mentioned elements to consider what the future may hold for tropical forest biota, ecosystems and peoples.

Stanford University, Mongabay and others published news reports about the work. You can view two here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/june/amazon-sustainability-model-061314.html

and  http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0703-morgan-indigenous-model.html

Article:

Iwamura T., Lambin E., Silvius K.M., Luzar J.B. & Fragoso J.M.V. 2014. Agent-based modeling of hunting and subsistence agriculture on indigenous lands: understanding interactions between social and ecological systems. Environmental Modelling & Software, 58: 109-127.

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Upcoming New Book! Wild Fruits of the Guiana Shield

Cover Fruits of Guyana Huffman and Fragoso 2014

Jean Huffman and Jose Fragoso have completed a draft of their book “Wild Fruits of the Guiana Shield”. They hope to submit it for publication by spring of 2016.

lowresJMVFGuyanaFruitBook_Part1_09_2014 (dragged)

A sneak peek at a page


Customized Atlases of the Rupununi, Amazon

Wowetta_Atlas_final (dragged)Jane Read from Syracuse University and the Fragoso lab (Project Fauna) produced atlases for 23 villages of the Rupununi, Guyana. Each atlas provides a socio-economic and environmental profile of the village.

Atlases for Fairview, Wowetta, Paipong / Tiger Pond, Katoka, Kwaimatta, Tipuru, Aishalton, Achawib, Para Bara, Karaudarnau and Awarewanau can be downloaded from the North Rupununi District Development Board at: http://www.nrddb.org/projectfaunaaltlases

The US National Public Radio’s The World program reported on our return of the atlases to communities. The reporter, Elsa Yougstead actually traveled for two weeks with us through the villages.  You can hear the report here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2011-08-25/slideshow-customized-atlases-amazon


“Assessing Carbon Stock Value of Forests is Tricky Business”

Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation

Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation (photo by Han Overman)

Mongabay’s Sanhya Sekar  wrote two articles concerning the Fragoso Group’s work with indigenous people’s field measurements of tropical forest carbon stocks.  Sekar writes  “With financial incentives encouraging maintenance of carbon stocks and the increased popularity of carbon trading between countries, a forest has become economically a lot more than a clump of trees that supplements livelihoods. A forest now has an intrinsic value by just existing, a value that can be measured in economic terms.”

The Mongabay articles can be seen here: http://news.mongabay.com/2015/02/assessing-carbon-stock-value-of-forests-is-tricky-business-study-finds/

CITATION: Butt, N., Epps, K., Overman, H., Iwamura, T., & Fragoso, J. M.V. (2015). Assessing carbon stocks using indigenous peoples’ field measurements in Amazonian Guyana. Forest Ecology and Management, 338, 191-199.

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