Category Archives: Guyana

The Amazon rainforest may be home to more animals than previously thought, Stanford scientists show

News report from Stanford University on our research: “By tapping the expertise of indigenous hunters, researchers found that conventional surveying techniques underestimate animal populations and miss species in the remote Amazon. Producing an accurate count is important for planning conservation efforts.” Continue reading

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New Publication: Line Transect Surveys Underdetect Terrestrial Mammals: Implications for the Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting

In corral behind house

Collared peccary (copyright photo Jose MV Fragoso)

Our new paper in the journal PLOS ONE reports that we are grossly under-detecting hunted animal species.  The results challenge the many studies showing serious negative impacts of subsistence hunting on wildlife species.  Seems like the animals may be hiding from us.  This research indicates that we need to reassess how we measure hunting impacts in the tropics.

Read the article:  http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152659


Stanford University publishes news piece regarding our new publication.

Large industrial soybean fields in midst of Cerradao forest

Industrial scale soybean fields cut from forest by the Xingu Indigenous Area,  Brazil  (Photo copyright by Jose Fragoso)

Stanford University reports on how our computer model simulating sustainability sheds light on how modern interventions can affect tropical forests and indigenous peoples. Our computer simulation shows that carefully designing government interactions with rural indigenous people is critical for protecting the sustainability of people, wildlife and the land.

Read the full article here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2016/march/amazon-model-fragoso-031116.html


New Publication: Socio–environmental sustainability of indigenous lands: simulating coupled human–natural systems in the Amazon

Tractor preparing soy bean field in the cerrado

Preparing field for planting soybeans near indigenous land in the Cerrado of Brazil         (Photo copyright by Jose Fragoso )

Our latest publication is out in Frontiers in Ecology and The Environment. We examine the socio-environmental sustainability of protected areas inhabited by indigenous and rural peoples and describe how socio-ecological change and development (e.g., forest clear-cutting outside indigenous areas, religious conversion, improved child mortality rates and introduction of resources from outside) outside these areas influences the sustainability of biodiversity, forest cover, and people inside. There are some surprising results so read the publication!

Read the article:

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More than 170 white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari) filmed crossing a 2 km wide river in Roraima, Brazil

WLP photo

White-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) in Roraima, Brazil (photo by Jose Fragoso).

More than 170 white-lipped peccaries were filmed crossing the Rio Branco River in Caracaraí County, Roraima, Brazil in the Amazon. The peccaries were filmed for over 30 minutes when  in the middle of the almost 2 km wide Rio Branco by agents of Brazil’s wildlife agency Ibama. Recording made on November 7, 2015.

View the video here: http://g1.globo.com/rr/roraima/noticia/2015/11/manada-de-mais-de-170-porcos-do-mato-atravessa-rio-de-rr-video.html  

Fragoso 2004 article:  Fragoso 2004 White-lip dissapearances

Fragoso 1997 article:  Fragoso 1997


 

New Publication: Utilizing Amerindian Hunter’s Descriptions to Guide the Production of a Vegetation Map

cummings-anthony-500-2014-08

Anthony Cummings (photo from the Web)

Map Rupununi

Anthony Ravindra Cummings led the Project Fauna team in the production of a vegetation map for the Rupununi region of Guyana, with the participation of Makushi, Wapichana and other Amerindians. Cummings and co-authors Jane Read (Syracuse University, USA) and Jose Fragoso state that with hunter’s vegetation descriptions and remotely sensed imagery we produced an eleven-class vegetation map that covered the main vegetation types described by hunters. “The final map shows that indigenous hunters can be important partners in the map-making process…”.

Full article:

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