Category Archives: Uncategorized

Levantamentos com Observações diretas Subestimam a Abundância de Mamíferos Terrestres: Implicações para uma Caça de Subsistência Sustentável

In corral behind house

Catitu (foto: Jose MV Fragoso)

A conservação de espécies cinegéticas neotropicais deve levar em conta os meios de vida e necessidades alimentares das populações humanas locais.

Artigo:  http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152659

Resumo: Continue reading

Stanford University publishes news piece regarding our new publication.

Large industrial soybean fields in midst of Cerradao forest

Industrial scale soybean fields cut from forest by the Xingu Indigenous Area,  Brazil  (Photo copyright by Jose Fragoso)

Stanford University reports on how our computer model simulating sustainability sheds light on how modern interventions can affect tropical forests and indigenous peoples. Our computer simulation shows that carefully designing government interactions with rural indigenous people is critical for protecting the sustainability of people, wildlife and the land.

Read the full article here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2016/march/amazon-model-fragoso-031116.html


New Publication: Socio–environmental sustainability of indigenous lands: simulating coupled human–natural systems in the Amazon

Tractor preparing soy bean field in the cerrado

Preparing field for planting soybeans near indigenous land in the Cerrado of Brazil         (Photo copyright by Jose Fragoso )

Our latest publication is out in Frontiers in Ecology and The Environment. We examine the socio-environmental sustainability of protected areas inhabited by indigenous and rural peoples and describe how socio-ecological change and development (e.g., forest clear-cutting outside indigenous areas, religious conversion, improved child mortality rates and introduction of resources from outside) outside these areas influences the sustainability of biodiversity, forest cover, and people inside. There are some surprising results so read the publication!

Read the article:

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Women in Science Summit 2016

Poster Announcing Women in Science Summit (Courstey of CAS)

Poster Announcing Women in Science Summit (Courstey of CAS)

Jose Fragoso was honored to serve as a panelist at the amazing Women in Science Summit at the California Academy of sciences on January 28, 2016. Amazing people described how they maintained family life, dealt with bias challenges and succeeded in their careers. Speakers included: Jane Goodall (Gombe Reserve), Sylvia Earle (National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence), Dawn Wright (ESRI), Pam Matson (Stanford University), Jane Lubchenco (former head of NOAA), Kathy Sullivan (the first woman to walk in space) Tom Lovejoy, Joan Roughgarden and others. Google Hangouts live streamed the event.

Watch the full event and all speakers at (Jose’s begins speaking at 7:41:15 into the recording. He recommends watching all the presenters.):  (https://plus.google.com/events/chqqlc7dt0em8j65g0nvo7o35uc).


 

Reaching the Children

Giving a presentation on the Amazon to about 100-150 grade 4 and 5 school Kids in Atherton. Photo by George Ugras

    Jose Fragoso presents a slide lecture on the Amazon to elementary  school children at the Encinal School, Ahterton, California. Photo by George Ugras

Stressing a need for scientists to occasionally step out of university classrooms and professional meetings, Jose Fragoso gave a slide presentation on the Amazon forest, its animals, plants and people at the Encinal Elementary School in Atherton, California, USA on Jan. 28, 2016. The rapt attention and amazing questions from the children reinforced the view that scientists should reach out more to children and other members of the public. About 100 grade five students, along with parents and teachers, attended the presentation.


Former Post-doc Takuya Iwamura takes Tenure-Track Position

Tak Iwanura 2015 (photo by Tak Iwamura)

Congratulations to Takuya (Tak) Iwamura, former post-doc with the Fragoso lab on attaining a tenure-track position as senior lecturer at the Zoology Department, Tel Aviv University (https://en-lifesci.tau.ac.il/profile/takuya).  Tak will continue his work on understanding biodiversity loss using a natural and human systems approach, spatial modelling and systematic conservation planning .


Large numbers of white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari) invade Amazonian town

WLP herd

White-lipped peccary herd in northern Brazil. Two individuals are radio-collared (Photo Jose Fragoso)

On November 10, 2015, large numbers of white-lipped peccaries moved across the town of Caracaraí in Roraima State, Brazil.  Many became trapped in yards or were killed by townspeople.  Caracaraí has a population of over 10,000 people.   Jose Fragoso (1997, 2004) described these exceptional movements as possible population level dispersal events or perhaps a herd that abandoned its usual home area after long term persecution by humans.

Newspaper story, photos and Fragoso articles hereContinue reading