Tag Archives: indigenous managment

Levantamentos com Observações diretas Subestimam a Abundância de Mamíferos Terrestres: Implicações para uma Caça de Subsistência Sustentável

In corral behind house

Catitu (foto: Jose MV Fragoso)

A conservação de espécies cinegéticas neotropicais deve levar em conta os meios de vida e necessidades alimentares das populações humanas locais.

Artigo:  http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152659

Resumo: Continue reading

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New Publication: Line Transect Surveys Underdetect Terrestrial Mammals: Implications for the Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting

In corral behind house

Collared peccary (copyright photo Jose MV Fragoso)

Our new paper in the journal PLOS ONE reports that we are grossly under-detecting hunted animal species.  The results challenge the many studies showing serious negative impacts of subsistence hunting on wildlife species.  Seems like the animals may be hiding from us.  This research indicates that we need to reassess how we measure hunting impacts in the tropics.

Read the article:  http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152659


Monitoring in Support of Local, National and International Environmental Priorities

Bina Hill students addressing commuity problems with our project at Bina Hill 2 workshop

Community discussion of potential problems of environmental monitoring by villagers (photo Jose Fragoso)

Jose Fragoso lectures at Stanford’s Center for Latin American Studies (link: http://events.stanford.edu/events/482/48261/) on what leads to success and failure in environmental and social monitoring by local people.

You can view a video recording of the lecture here: https://vimeo.com/117443887

The lecture is highly recommended for academics, researchers, professionals and students interested in the success and failure of participatory and citizen science monitoring approaches


“A fine line: new computer program predicts when human impact becomes too much”

Village by an Amazonian river (photo by Jose Fragoso)

We have completed a major work describing the sustainability of hunting, farming (land use) and local livelihoods in the tropics. We devised an agent based computer simulation model and explored the relationships between the above mentioned elements to consider what the future may hold for tropical forest biota, ecosystems and peoples.

Stanford University, Mongabay and others published news reports about the work. You can view two here: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/june/amazon-sustainability-model-061314.html

and  http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0703-morgan-indigenous-model.html

Article:

Iwamura T., Lambin E., Silvius K.M., Luzar J.B. & Fragoso J.M.V. 2014. Agent-based modeling of hunting and subsistence agriculture on indigenous lands: understanding interactions between social and ecological systems. Environmental Modelling & Software, 58: 109-127.

View full article: Continue reading

Customized Atlases of the Rupununi, Amazon

Wowetta_Atlas_final (dragged)Jane Read from Syracuse University and the Fragoso lab (Project Fauna) produced atlases for 23 villages of the Rupununi, Guyana. Each atlas provides a socio-economic and environmental profile of the village.

Atlases for Fairview, Wowetta, Paipong / Tiger Pond, Katoka, Kwaimatta, Tipuru, Aishalton, Achawib, Para Bara, Karaudarnau and Awarewanau can be downloaded from the North Rupununi District Development Board at: http://www.nrddb.org/projectfaunaaltlases

The US National Public Radio’s The World program reported on our return of the atlases to communities. The reporter, Elsa Yougstead actually traveled for two weeks with us through the villages.  You can hear the report here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2011-08-25/slideshow-customized-atlases-amazon