Tag Archives: REDD

National REDD+ Implications for Tenured Indigenous Communities in Guyana, and Communities’ Impact on Forest Carbon Stocks: New Publication in “Forests”

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Makushi and Wapichana parabiologists at vegetation and soil assessment training workshop. Dr, Kye Epps, course leader at bottom left.

We used a technically approved United Nations Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL) submission and Opt-In Mechanism to assess how fifteen indigenous communities with tenured forestland may financially benefit from national REDD+. We provide a first-time assessment whether field estimates of the average carbon density of mature forests managed by fifteen forest-dependent communities equals that of nearby unmanaged mature forest, as this could affect REDD+ payment levels. We conclude that, notwithstanding some pending issues, Guyana’s national REDD+ program could be very beneficial for FDP, even under a modest United States (US) $5 unit carbon price.

Free access to full paper: http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4907/9/5/231


“Assessing Carbon Stock Value of Forests is Tricky Business”

Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation

Dr. Kye Epps instructs Makushi field researchers on measuring trees for carbon estimation (photo by Han Overman)

Mongabay’s Sanhya Sekar  wrote two articles concerning the Fragoso Group’s work with indigenous people’s field measurements of tropical forest carbon stocks.  Sekar writes  “With financial incentives encouraging maintenance of carbon stocks and the increased popularity of carbon trading between countries, a forest has become economically a lot more than a clump of trees that supplements livelihoods. A forest now has an intrinsic value by just existing, a value that can be measured in economic terms.”

The Mongabay articles can be seen here: http://news.mongabay.com/2015/02/assessing-carbon-stock-value-of-forests-is-tricky-business-study-finds/

CITATION: Butt, N., Epps, K., Overman, H., Iwamura, T., & Fragoso, J. M.V. (2015). Assessing carbon stocks using indigenous peoples’ field measurements in Amazonian Guyana. Forest Ecology and Management, 338, 191-199.

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