Tag Archives: tropical biodiversity

New Publication: Line Transect Surveys Underdetect Terrestrial Mammals: Implications for the Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting

In corral behind house

Collared peccary (copyright photo Jose MV Fragoso)

Our new paper in the journal PLOS ONE reports that we are grossly under-detecting hunted animal species.  The results challenge the many studies showing serious negative impacts of subsistence hunting on wildlife species.  Seems like the animals may be hiding from us.  This research indicates that we need to reassess how we measure hunting impacts in the tropics.

Read the article:  http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0152659


Modelo prevê impacto de fatores externos em tribos indígenas: Reportagem no jornal O Globo

Making farina in Kwanamer village, Wai Wai area

Muheres Uaiuais preparam farinha de mandioca tradicional (Foto: José Fragoso)

“Populações habitam a região amazônica há milhares de anos, mas o avanço de elementos da vida moderna está pondo em risco a sustentabilidade desses povos e do ecossistema onde vivem. Essa é a conclusão de um estudo elaborado pela equipe do biólogo português José Fragoso, da Universidade Stanford, nos EUA.” “ — Os resultados da pesquisa mostram que apenas não invadir áreas indígenas não é suficiente — diz Fragoso. — O que acontece no entorno das reservas tem grande impacto no interior.”

Reportagem do O Globo:Modelo prevê impacto de fatores externos em tribos indígenas – Jornal O Globo


Large numbers of white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari) invade Amazonian town

WLP herd

White-lipped peccary herd in northern Brazil. Two individuals are radio-collared (Photo Jose Fragoso)

On November 10, 2015, large numbers of white-lipped peccaries moved across the town of Caracaraí in Roraima State, Brazil.  Many became trapped in yards or were killed by townspeople.  Caracaraí has a population of over 10,000 people.   Jose Fragoso (1997, 2004) described these exceptional movements as possible population level dispersal events or perhaps a herd that abandoned its usual home area after long term persecution by humans.

Newspaper story, photos and Fragoso articles hereContinue reading

Gathering Data on Plants and Animals in the Amazon Basin

Caiman 4 092

Spectacled Caiman (photo by Jose Fragoso)

Stanford University produced a short documentary of our monitoring of plants and animals of the Amazon. Watch amazing scenes of caimans, capybaras, tapirs, giant anteaters, giant otters, macaws and other unusual creatures filmed during our field studies. The interview focuses on the successful monitoring of these animals by indigenous people. The take home message is that indigenous people use wildlife in a sustainable fashion.

Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upmzEzuF_ls


Customized Atlases of the Rupununi, Amazon

Wowetta_Atlas_final (dragged)Jane Read from Syracuse University and the Fragoso lab (Project Fauna) produced atlases for 23 villages of the Rupununi, Guyana. Each atlas provides a socio-economic and environmental profile of the village.

Atlases for Fairview, Wowetta, Paipong / Tiger Pond, Katoka, Kwaimatta, Tipuru, Aishalton, Achawib, Para Bara, Karaudarnau and Awarewanau can be downloaded from the North Rupununi District Development Board at: http://www.nrddb.org/projectfaunaaltlases

The US National Public Radio’s The World program reported on our return of the atlases to communities. The reporter, Elsa Yougstead actually traveled for two weeks with us through the villages.  You can hear the report here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2011-08-25/slideshow-customized-atlases-amazon